Last edited by Yozshurisar
Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of London life in the nineteenth century as revealed in the Guildhall (Library) collection of broadsides. found in the catalog.

London life in the nineteenth century as revealed in the Guildhall (Library) collection of broadsides.

David Cunniffe

London life in the nineteenth century as revealed in the Guildhall (Library) collection of broadsides.

by David Cunniffe

  • 109 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination42 l ;
Number of Pages42
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20290716M

  No attempt was made to filter the water or protect it from pollution until the middle of the 19th-century. In , Tobias Smollet wrote, "If I would drink water, I must quaff the mawkish contents of an open aqueduct, exposed to all manner of defilement, or swallow that which comes from the River Thames, impregnated with all the filth of London. The London Diocese Book, first published but available at Guildhall Library only from to date, lists incumbents and curates, within the diocese of London only, arranged by parish, with index to names. Dates are given of ordination and also of institution or collation to current incumbency, or of licensing to current curacy.

  Guildhall Art Gallery: Hidden Gem - See traveler reviews, candid photos, and great deals for London, UK, at Tripadvisor TripAdvisor reviews.   The Ghost Map by Steven Johnson a fascinating book about cholera in London St. Pancras Station by Simon Bradley about the Gothic Revival bldg that now houses the Eurostar terminal People of the Abyss, Jack London's study of the 19th century East End The Frozen Thames by Helen Humphreys - about Frost Fairs and the like Peter Whitfield's London.

She is working on a book on seventeenth-century London, and developing a project to map London on the eve of the Great Fire of Acknowledgements I am grateful to numerous colleagues and friends for help in this research, particularly Ann Martin, Jo Wisdom, Peter Ross, and Valerie Hart of Guildhall Library, London, Jane Toms, Margaret. revelatory portrait of everyday life on the streets of dickens london the nineteenth century was a time book about london life during the time charles dickens walked its streets now in the victorian city she but just as flanders the victorian house revealed the long lost daily routines of the victorian home so.


Share this book
You might also like
Mathematics 2000 (Maths 2000)

Mathematics 2000 (Maths 2000)

Engineering Plastics

Engineering Plastics

Outlines of the doctrine of the Nichiren sect

Outlines of the doctrine of the Nichiren sect

Italian-English, English-Italian dictionary =

Italian-English, English-Italian dictionary =

Asthetic Plastic Surgery

Asthetic Plastic Surgery

The thirteenth report of the American Unitarian Association

The thirteenth report of the American Unitarian Association

Guide to the organization of a hospital medical record department.

Guide to the organization of a hospital medical record department.

Nominations--ICC

Nominations--ICC

ecosystem approach

ecosystem approach

Homer

Homer

The phantom of the opera.

The phantom of the opera.

Era of challenge

Era of challenge

London life in the nineteenth century as revealed in the Guildhall (Library) collection of broadsides by David Cunniffe Download PDF EPUB FB2

During the 19th century, London grew enormously to become a global city of immense was the largest city in the world from aboutthe world's largest port, and the heart of international finance and trade. Railways connecting London to the rest of Britain, as well as the London Underground, were built, as were roads, a modern sewer system and many famous sites.

At the start of the 19th century, a criminal hanged in London was seemingly brought back to life through an early use of electricity to re-animate the dead – something called Galvanism. It was this primitive use of electricity that inspired Mary Shelley to write the novel Frankenstein.

Jerry White is professor in history at Birkbeck, University of London, specialising in working-class London life sinceand author of London in the Nineteenth Century (Jonathan Cape, ).

This article complemented a five-part BBC Two series The Victorian Slum, showing modern families living in simulated slums, which aired in autumn Author: Elinor Evans. Facts about London in the 19th Century 5: immigrants.

The people who came from the poor countries in Europe were interested to migrate to London for a better life. The city was like a magnet for the immigrants to get better life. Facts about London in the 19th Century. Another in the occasional series on contemporary accounts and descriptions of the historic City of London, this memorable – if gushing – one from the prologue to William Fitzstephen’s “Vita Sancti Thomae” or “Life of St.

Thomas [Becket]”, probably penned in the s or early s “The fame of the city of London Among the splendid cities of the world that have achieved. As for reputations this is a difficult question to answer.

In the 19th century the London press frequently offered their opinion of the character of the magistrates that served the various police courts of the capital. However, the 18th-century press is less forthcoming. During the later eighteenth century per cent of husbands compared to per cent of wives had been born in the capital: George, M.

D., London life in the eighteenth century (Harmondsworth, ), The proportion of Londoners amongst the male population certainly increased over the seventeenth century. Insurance is a business in which trust is the corollary of risk taking.

One problem for the insurance industry in eighteenth and early nineteenth-century Britain was how to bridge the gap between the world of business based upon personal trust, and the emergence of new commercial relations where moral hazard was mass produced and where a commanding knowledge of personal reputations was.

The City of London is a city, ceremonial county and local government district that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the modern city named London has since grown far beyond the formal City of London borders.

The post-medieval history of the Guildhall complex is also considered, albeit in considerably less detail, understandably given that only relatively minor building works were to take place prior to the early 19th century.

Rebuilding work following the Great Fire is described merely as ‘an engineering as opposed to architectural task’. Brick sewers had been built in London from the 17th century when sections of the Fleet and Walbrook rivers were covered for that purpose. In the century precedingover a hundred sewers were constructed in London, and at that date the city had aroundcesspits and sewers.

Some cesspits leaked methane and other gases, which often caught fire and exploded, leading to loss of life. London in the Nineteenth Century by Jerry White pp, Jonathan Cape, £ In London was home topeople and spanned five miles from east to west.

Although it. ‘Pea-souper’ fog epitomises olde-worlde London in Hollywood movies, but is a feature of London life well into the 20th century. In the Great London Smog of a lethal combination of fog and smoke generated by domestic coal fires ki Londoners.

Intravel writing like John Diprose's Book about London and London Life illustrated a typical sight one would supposedly encounter in London at a.m.: a woman apprehended by the police after a drowning attempt.

Diprose related her familiar wayward path: she left her country home with a seducer who abandoned her in London, and her. Life was hard for 17th-century Londoners—and death came both often and mysteriously.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in John Graunt’s “Natural and Political Observations Made Upon the. It is an era popularised by Guy Fawkes, the plague and the Great Fire of London.

But, as author Matt Brown explains, much of what we think we know about the 17th century is incorrect. Here, writing for History Extra, he picks apart some of the myths and misconceptions about the period.

Lease of a Garden, called the "Hermitage," near the Gate of Alegate. 19 Edward II. A.D. Letter-Book E. fol. clv. (Latin.) At the Husting of Common Pleas holden on Monday the Eve of St.

James the Apostle [25 July], in the 19th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, that garden on the South side of the Gate of Alegate, called the "Hermitage," which Roger atte Watre, the Serjeant, held. The view eastwards along Gresham Street.

St Lawrence Jewry, which faces the Guildhall, was built by Wren in –80 and restored after the Second World War. In the distance are the Leadenhall Building, dubbed the Cheesegrater (begun ), Bishopsgate, presently being completed.

©John Goodall / Country Life. London Town and other 19th century treasures. The first was The Gigantick History of the Two Famous Giants and other Curiosities in Guildhall, London in two tiny (59 x 45mm) volumes, published. London continued to be a great port in the 19th century. In the 18th century ships tied up at wharves on the Thames but the river became overcrowded so docks were built.

West India dock (), London dock (), East India Dock () St Katherines dock (), Victoria dock (), Millwall dock () South West India dock (), Albert. Nonetheless, many interesting older buildings remain, including the domed St. Paul's Cathedral (heroically saved by firefighters when it was bombed during the Second World War), 19th-century buildings at Leadenhall, Smithfield, and Spitalfields, the Gothic-style Guildhall, many monuments (including one built to remember the Great Fire of London.

I n London was already the biggest city in Europe; by it had become the largest in the world. It was home to both the most magnificent and the most squalid lives. In his new book.Trials and tribulations.

The stage for state trials and remonstrances to kings, Guildhall has played a key part in London's dramatic history.

Peers, an archbishop and a queen were tried for treason during the Reformation and, as the Great Fire swept through London in Septemberdestroying seven-eighths of the medieval City, Guildhall stood a "fearfull spectacle as if it had been a.